7.Nay Chi and her mother, Myo Pa Pa, the founder of Down Syndrome association in Myanmar. Photo by Ann Wang

By following a couple of families with Down Syndrome children or adults, this project aim to show the limited resources these families have, which includes the county does not have facilities training special needs teacher,  and discrimination against disable people, causing people with Down Syndrome in Myanmar rarely receives education. Yet, the families of the Down Syndrome children determent to make a change, with or without the help from the government.

7.Nay Chi and her mother, Myo Pa Pa, the founder of Down Syndrome association in Myanmar. Photo by Ann Wang By following a couple of families with Down Syndrome children or adults, this project aim to show the limited resources these families have, which includes the county does not have facilities training special needs teacher, and discrimination against disable people, causing people with Down Syndrome in Myanmar rarely receives education. Yet, the families of the Down Syndrome children determent to make a change, with or without the help from the government.

 4.Kan Nay Chi Khin interacting with a stuff at a restaurant. People in Myanmar generally have no knowledge about Down syndrome, but because the family comes to this restaurant very often. The stuff is really familiar with Nay Chi. Photo by Ann Wang

By following a couple of families with Down Syndrome children or adults, this project aim to show the limited resources these families have, which includes the county does not have facilities training special needs teacher,  and discrimination against disable people, causing people with Down Syndrome in Myanmar rarely receives education. Yet, the families of the Down Syndrome children determent to make a change, with or without the help from the government.

4.Kan Nay Chi Khin interacting with a stuff at a restaurant. People in Myanmar generally have no knowledge about Down syndrome, but because the family comes to this restaurant very often. The stuff is really familiar with Nay Chi. Photo by Ann Wang By following a couple of families with Down Syndrome children or adults, this project aim to show the limited resources these families have, which includes the county does not have facilities training special needs teacher, and discrimination against disable people, causing people with Down Syndrome in Myanmar rarely receives education. Yet, the families of the Down Syndrome children determent to make a change, with or without the help from the government.

 Nay Chi struggling under the water. Photo by Ann Wang

Nay Chi struggling under the water. Photo by Ann Wang

AW_DSMyanmar13.jpg
 Nay Chi is eight years older than her little sister Yait Su Wai. Her parents wants to make sure that they have an idea how to take care of Nay Chi who has down Syndrome before they want another kid. Photo by Ann Wang

Nay Chi is eight years older than her little sister Yait Su Wai. Her parents wants to make sure that they have an idea how to take care of Nay Chi who has down Syndrome before they want another kid. Photo by Ann Wang

 2.Due to the little understanding of Down Syndrome within the medical flied in Myanmar, the Myanmar Down Syndrome Association decided to partner with medical students and provide free dental care for more than 250 people with down Syndrome at Down Syndrome Day on October 25, 2015. For many families, it was their first time receiving dental care. Photo by Ann Wang

By following a couple of families with Down Syndrome children or adults, this project aim to show the limited resources these families have, which includes the county does not have facilities training special needs teacher,  and discrimination against disable people, causing people with Down Syndrome in Myanmar rarely receives education. Yet, the families of the Down Syndrome children determent to make a change, with or without the help from the government.

2.Due to the little understanding of Down Syndrome within the medical flied in Myanmar, the Myanmar Down Syndrome Association decided to partner with medical students and provide free dental care for more than 250 people with down Syndrome at Down Syndrome Day on October 25, 2015. For many families, it was their first time receiving dental care. Photo by Ann Wang By following a couple of families with Down Syndrome children or adults, this project aim to show the limited resources these families have, which includes the county does not have facilities training special needs teacher, and discrimination against disable people, causing people with Down Syndrome in Myanmar rarely receives education. Yet, the families of the Down Syndrome children determent to make a change, with or without the help from the government.

 3. There are still no exact number of the people with Down Syndrome living in Myanmar.  But more than 250 people with Down Syndrome show up for the Down Syndrome day in Yangon on October 25, 2015. Photo by Ann Wang

By following a couple of families with Down Syndrome children or adults, this project aim to show the limited resources these families have, which includes the county does not have facilities training special needs teacher,  and discrimination against disable people, causing people with Down Syndrome in Myanmar rarely receives education. Yet, the families of the Down Syndrome children determent to make a change, with or without the help from the government.

3. There are still no exact number of the people with Down Syndrome living in Myanmar. But more than 250 people with Down Syndrome show up for the Down Syndrome day in Yangon on October 25, 2015. Photo by Ann Wang By following a couple of families with Down Syndrome children or adults, this project aim to show the limited resources these families have, which includes the county does not have facilities training special needs teacher, and discrimination against disable people, causing people with Down Syndrome in Myanmar rarely receives education. Yet, the families of the Down Syndrome children determent to make a change, with or without the help from the government.

 Theint theint Thu, 19 (left) goes to swimming training four times per week at the North Dagon sports stadium for the disabled. According to her family, Theint Theint has lost a lot of weight since started the swimming class four months ago, she is healthier and happier, because she has made friends with other down syndrome people at the swimming pool. Photo by Ann Wang

Theint theint Thu, 19 (left) goes to swimming training four times per week at the North Dagon sports stadium for the disabled. According to her family, Theint Theint has lost a lot of weight since started the swimming class four months ago, she is healthier and happier, because she has made friends with other down syndrome people at the swimming pool. Photo by Ann Wang

 Theint Theint Thu taking a break from the swimming class. Coming to swimming class has give her a chance to get out of the house, she has since been a lot more happy and talkative according to her family members. Photo by Ann Wang

Theint Theint Thu taking a break from the swimming class. Coming to swimming class has give her a chance to get out of the house, she has since been a lot more happy and talkative according to her family members. Photo by Ann Wang

 8. Theint Theint Thu, 19,  refused to let go of her hand, even though she has been training for four months, being in the water is still a big challenge for her. Photo by Ann Wang

By following a couple of families with Down Syndrome children or adults, this project aim to show the limited resources these families have, which includes the county does not have facilities training special needs teacher,  and discrimination against disable people, causing people with Down Syndrome in Myanmar rarely receives education. Yet, the families of the Down Syndrome children determent to make a change, with or without the help from the government.

8. Theint Theint Thu, 19, refused to let go of her hand, even though she has been training for four months, being in the water is still a big challenge for her. Photo by Ann Wang By following a couple of families with Down Syndrome children or adults, this project aim to show the limited resources these families have, which includes the county does not have facilities training special needs teacher, and discrimination against disable people, causing people with Down Syndrome in Myanmar rarely receives education. Yet, the families of the Down Syndrome children determent to make a change, with or without the help from the government.

 Theint theint Thu a 19 year old with Down Syndrome is able to dress herself and put on thanaka. Photo by Ann wang

Theint theint Thu a 19 year old with Down Syndrome is able to dress herself and put on thanaka. Photo by Ann wang

 Photos of Theint Theint Thu in the living room. Photo by Ann Wang

Photos of Theint Theint Thu in the living room. Photo by Ann Wang

 12.Theint Theint Thu has never attend school, but because she grew up in the family own printing shop. She knows how to type, but have trouble understanding the text and staying concentrated. Photo by Ann Wang

By following a couple of families with Down Syndrome children or adults, this project aim to show the limited resources these families have, which includes the county does not have facilities training special needs teacher,  and discrimination against disable people, causing people with Down Syndrome in Myanmar rarely receives education. Yet, the families of the Down Syndrome children determent to make a change, with or without the help from the government.

12.Theint Theint Thu has never attend school, but because she grew up in the family own printing shop. She knows how to type, but have trouble understanding the text and staying concentrated. Photo by Ann Wang By following a couple of families with Down Syndrome children or adults, this project aim to show the limited resources these families have, which includes the county does not have facilities training special needs teacher, and discrimination against disable people, causing people with Down Syndrome in Myanmar rarely receives education. Yet, the families of the Down Syndrome children determent to make a change, with or without the help from the government.

 Theint Theint Thu attempt to introduce the stuff at the printing shop in English. Photo by Ann wang

Theint Theint Thu attempt to introduce the stuff at the printing shop in English. Photo by Ann wang

 Theint Theint Thu’s mother kissing her on the check. The family never thought about giving her up because she has down syndrome, instead they focus on what to do to make her happy everyday. Photo by Ann Wang

Theint Theint Thu’s mother kissing her on the check. The family never thought about giving her up because she has down syndrome, instead they focus on what to do to make her happy everyday. Photo by Ann Wang

 7.Nay Chi and her mother, Myo Pa Pa, the founder of Down Syndrome association in Myanmar. Photo by Ann Wang

By following a couple of families with Down Syndrome children or adults, this project aim to show the limited resources these families have, which includes the county does not have facilities training special needs teacher,  and discrimination against disable people, causing people with Down Syndrome in Myanmar rarely receives education. Yet, the families of the Down Syndrome children determent to make a change, with or without the help from the government.
 4.Kan Nay Chi Khin interacting with a stuff at a restaurant. People in Myanmar generally have no knowledge about Down syndrome, but because the family comes to this restaurant very often. The stuff is really familiar with Nay Chi. Photo by Ann Wang

By following a couple of families with Down Syndrome children or adults, this project aim to show the limited resources these families have, which includes the county does not have facilities training special needs teacher,  and discrimination against disable people, causing people with Down Syndrome in Myanmar rarely receives education. Yet, the families of the Down Syndrome children determent to make a change, with or without the help from the government.
 Nay Chi struggling under the water. Photo by Ann Wang
AW_DSMyanmar13.jpg
 Nay Chi is eight years older than her little sister Yait Su Wai. Her parents wants to make sure that they have an idea how to take care of Nay Chi who has down Syndrome before they want another kid. Photo by Ann Wang
 2.Due to the little understanding of Down Syndrome within the medical flied in Myanmar, the Myanmar Down Syndrome Association decided to partner with medical students and provide free dental care for more than 250 people with down Syndrome at Down Syndrome Day on October 25, 2015. For many families, it was their first time receiving dental care. Photo by Ann Wang

By following a couple of families with Down Syndrome children or adults, this project aim to show the limited resources these families have, which includes the county does not have facilities training special needs teacher,  and discrimination against disable people, causing people with Down Syndrome in Myanmar rarely receives education. Yet, the families of the Down Syndrome children determent to make a change, with or without the help from the government.
 3. There are still no exact number of the people with Down Syndrome living in Myanmar.  But more than 250 people with Down Syndrome show up for the Down Syndrome day in Yangon on October 25, 2015. Photo by Ann Wang

By following a couple of families with Down Syndrome children or adults, this project aim to show the limited resources these families have, which includes the county does not have facilities training special needs teacher,  and discrimination against disable people, causing people with Down Syndrome in Myanmar rarely receives education. Yet, the families of the Down Syndrome children determent to make a change, with or without the help from the government.
 Theint theint Thu, 19 (left) goes to swimming training four times per week at the North Dagon sports stadium for the disabled. According to her family, Theint Theint has lost a lot of weight since started the swimming class four months ago, she is healthier and happier, because she has made friends with other down syndrome people at the swimming pool. Photo by Ann Wang
 Theint Theint Thu taking a break from the swimming class. Coming to swimming class has give her a chance to get out of the house, she has since been a lot more happy and talkative according to her family members. Photo by Ann Wang
 8. Theint Theint Thu, 19,  refused to let go of her hand, even though she has been training for four months, being in the water is still a big challenge for her. Photo by Ann Wang

By following a couple of families with Down Syndrome children or adults, this project aim to show the limited resources these families have, which includes the county does not have facilities training special needs teacher,  and discrimination against disable people, causing people with Down Syndrome in Myanmar rarely receives education. Yet, the families of the Down Syndrome children determent to make a change, with or without the help from the government.
 Theint theint Thu a 19 year old with Down Syndrome is able to dress herself and put on thanaka. Photo by Ann wang
 Photos of Theint Theint Thu in the living room. Photo by Ann Wang
 12.Theint Theint Thu has never attend school, but because she grew up in the family own printing shop. She knows how to type, but have trouble understanding the text and staying concentrated. Photo by Ann Wang

By following a couple of families with Down Syndrome children or adults, this project aim to show the limited resources these families have, which includes the county does not have facilities training special needs teacher,  and discrimination against disable people, causing people with Down Syndrome in Myanmar rarely receives education. Yet, the families of the Down Syndrome children determent to make a change, with or without the help from the government.
 Theint Theint Thu attempt to introduce the stuff at the printing shop in English. Photo by Ann wang
 Theint Theint Thu’s mother kissing her on the check. The family never thought about giving her up because she has down syndrome, instead they focus on what to do to make her happy everyday. Photo by Ann Wang

7.Nay Chi and her mother, Myo Pa Pa, the founder of Down Syndrome association in Myanmar. Photo by Ann Wang By following a couple of families with Down Syndrome children or adults, this project aim to show the limited resources these families have, which includes the county does not have facilities training special needs teacher, and discrimination against disable people, causing people with Down Syndrome in Myanmar rarely receives education. Yet, the families of the Down Syndrome children determent to make a change, with or without the help from the government.

4.Kan Nay Chi Khin interacting with a stuff at a restaurant. People in Myanmar generally have no knowledge about Down syndrome, but because the family comes to this restaurant very often. The stuff is really familiar with Nay Chi. Photo by Ann Wang By following a couple of families with Down Syndrome children or adults, this project aim to show the limited resources these families have, which includes the county does not have facilities training special needs teacher, and discrimination against disable people, causing people with Down Syndrome in Myanmar rarely receives education. Yet, the families of the Down Syndrome children determent to make a change, with or without the help from the government.

Nay Chi struggling under the water. Photo by Ann Wang

Nay Chi is eight years older than her little sister Yait Su Wai. Her parents wants to make sure that they have an idea how to take care of Nay Chi who has down Syndrome before they want another kid. Photo by Ann Wang

2.Due to the little understanding of Down Syndrome within the medical flied in Myanmar, the Myanmar Down Syndrome Association decided to partner with medical students and provide free dental care for more than 250 people with down Syndrome at Down Syndrome Day on October 25, 2015. For many families, it was their first time receiving dental care. Photo by Ann Wang By following a couple of families with Down Syndrome children or adults, this project aim to show the limited resources these families have, which includes the county does not have facilities training special needs teacher, and discrimination against disable people, causing people with Down Syndrome in Myanmar rarely receives education. Yet, the families of the Down Syndrome children determent to make a change, with or without the help from the government.

3. There are still no exact number of the people with Down Syndrome living in Myanmar. But more than 250 people with Down Syndrome show up for the Down Syndrome day in Yangon on October 25, 2015. Photo by Ann Wang By following a couple of families with Down Syndrome children or adults, this project aim to show the limited resources these families have, which includes the county does not have facilities training special needs teacher, and discrimination against disable people, causing people with Down Syndrome in Myanmar rarely receives education. Yet, the families of the Down Syndrome children determent to make a change, with or without the help from the government.

Theint theint Thu, 19 (left) goes to swimming training four times per week at the North Dagon sports stadium for the disabled. According to her family, Theint Theint has lost a lot of weight since started the swimming class four months ago, she is healthier and happier, because she has made friends with other down syndrome people at the swimming pool. Photo by Ann Wang

Theint Theint Thu taking a break from the swimming class. Coming to swimming class has give her a chance to get out of the house, she has since been a lot more happy and talkative according to her family members. Photo by Ann Wang

8. Theint Theint Thu, 19, refused to let go of her hand, even though she has been training for four months, being in the water is still a big challenge for her. Photo by Ann Wang By following a couple of families with Down Syndrome children or adults, this project aim to show the limited resources these families have, which includes the county does not have facilities training special needs teacher, and discrimination against disable people, causing people with Down Syndrome in Myanmar rarely receives education. Yet, the families of the Down Syndrome children determent to make a change, with or without the help from the government.

Theint theint Thu a 19 year old with Down Syndrome is able to dress herself and put on thanaka. Photo by Ann wang

Photos of Theint Theint Thu in the living room. Photo by Ann Wang

12.Theint Theint Thu has never attend school, but because she grew up in the family own printing shop. She knows how to type, but have trouble understanding the text and staying concentrated. Photo by Ann Wang By following a couple of families with Down Syndrome children or adults, this project aim to show the limited resources these families have, which includes the county does not have facilities training special needs teacher, and discrimination against disable people, causing people with Down Syndrome in Myanmar rarely receives education. Yet, the families of the Down Syndrome children determent to make a change, with or without the help from the government.

Theint Theint Thu attempt to introduce the stuff at the printing shop in English. Photo by Ann wang

Theint Theint Thu’s mother kissing her on the check. The family never thought about giving her up because she has down syndrome, instead they focus on what to do to make her happy everyday. Photo by Ann Wang

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